Golf Australia Sportscover Australia Pty Ltd.
 
 
NEWS

Medical Emergencies on the golf course

 

Is your club properly prepared to manage a member or employee suffering a life threatening injury, having a heart attack, stroke, diabetic reaction, or even a sudden cardiac arrest?

Is there a clear and understood process to ensure that all coaches, officials and volunteers are aware of their role in an emergency?

A medical emergency on the golf course requires immediate response by your staff to prevent a crisis that will have lasting impact on your entire club for years to come. Being prepared to manage any incident with a professional, competent and caring response will make the difference between a disaster and providing the ultimate in customer service.

Importantly, all golf clubs have a duty of care to ensure a safe environment is available to those in their care. This includes having a clearly documented plan that outlines the actions and processes that need to be fulfilled in an emergency situation. In order to satisfy or `discharge’ your duty of care you must behave as a `reasonable person’ would but taking into account your specific skills, knowledge and experience. For example, a committee member could be negligent if they placed a person in a position which required them to be in charge of the medical care of golfers when that person was not suitability qualified. A club could be negligent if they did not provide a safe playing environment for golfers and had no policies in place to ensure that first aid care requirements were met.

It is recommended that all resident golf professionals and club managers undergo suitable first aid training. It is recommended that a person with suitable experience be appointed as the first aid officer.

Establish an emergency plan

A comprehensive emergency plan should be in place to cover all types of emergency. They may include incidents such as fire, violence and environmental threats. This Risk Advisory Snapshot focusses on medical emergencies that are likely to occur on the golf course. A typical emergency plan may include reference to items such as:

The processes and the actions required of key personnel in the event of an emergency.

  • Each person should be familiar with their role and the actions required of them in an emergency. These roles should be understood by all involved. This may include coaches, officials, volunteers, members, etc.
  • The location of the nearest phone and a list of telephone numbers for ambulance, local hospital or local health professional.
  • To avoid numerous people calling for emergency services, everyone involved in an incident should be aware of who is responsible for emergency services.
  • The designated caller should also know the location of the nearest phone. All appropriate telephone numbers should be listed next to the telephone.
  • If a mobile phone is used, make sure the caller makes the call from a quiet location with suitable mobile coverage.

The address details of the venue at which the event is being held, and in particular, any special directions that need to be conveyed to emergency response personnel.

  • In circumstances where a medical professional or ambulance needs to be called, they should be given any special directions for easy access to the venue and injured player.
  • Venues should also ensure that designated access is available to emergency vehicles and the access is kept clear.

The person designated to take the lead responsibility in the plan.

  • Each person involved should know who will coordinate activities during an incident. This person plays a vital role in ensuring all aspects of the plan are fulfilled before, during and after an incident.

The location of any first aid and emergency equipment if required.

  • Like the telephone, this should be in an accessible location.
  • First aid supplies should always be well-stocked, so consideration should be given to allocating responsibility for first aid supply maintenance.

Contact details for parents, legal guardians or next of kin.

  • Someone should have the responsibility of informing parents, legal guardians or next of kin following the incident.
  • The type of details to be conveyed should also be clearly specified and medical details should only be conveyed by, or with approval from, medical personnel.

Incident report forms and processes.

  • All incidents should be well documented using an incident response form. This should be securely stored for future reference.

It is important that all personnel are aware of their role and required actions in the emergency plan. Emergency plans should be documented and communicated to all club members and participants. These plans should be updated regularly, and ideally should be rehearsed often for reinforcement of actions.

Although these incidents may not occur often, a sound, communicated and well-understood emergency plan may mean the difference between life and death in an emergency situation.

Example Medical Emergency Plan

Roles and Responsibilities

In the advent of a medical emergency/serious injury the assigned people will assume the following roles. (Each role should be accompanied by a list of duties and multiple roles may be required to be filled by one person)

  • Emergency Co-ordinator - (insert name)
  • Sports First Aid - (insert name/s)
  • Crowd Control - (insert name/s)
  • Communication Co-ordinator - (insert name)

In instances where any of the assigned people are not available an alternative representative must fill their role.

Leadership

The Emergency Co-ordinator (insert name) will be responsible for ensuring that all aspects of the plan are fulfilled before during and after the incident. This may include:

  • Availability of personnel at events
  • Sports first aid and communication resources
  • Direction of personnel at incidents
  • Completion of tasks following incidents
  • Record keeping

First Aid

  • A sports first aid kit is located at (insert location)
  • A sign will be erected to identify the location of the Sports first aid area
  • It is the responsibility of the Sports First-Aider to keep the first aid kit stocked. The Sports first aid kit will be checked (insert frequency e.g. weekly). Missing supplies will be ordered (insert frequency e.g. monthly).

Communication

  • The communications co-ordinator is responsible for contacting emergency services (e.g. ambulance) if required
  • The nearest telephone is located at (insert location)
  • Mobile phone calls for emergency purposes should be made from (insert location)
  • A list of relevant emergency numbers will be posted at (insert the location where phone calls to emergency services are to be made)
  • A list of any special directions for emergency services personnel will be posted at the same location as the emergency numbers (insert locations)
  • (Insert name) will be responsible for ensuring that access for emergency services is kept clear.

Contacts

  • All players/participants must supply the name and contact details of two (2) guardians/next of kin at the commencement of each season
  • Contact names of guardians/next of kin are to be kept on file and accessible during events and training
  • It is the responsibility of (insert name) to contact guardians/next of kin in the advent of a serious injury to a player/participant
  • The type of information conveyed to a guardian/next of kin should include
  • Description of the incident
  • Transport arrangements (if any) for the injured player
  • Current location and any immediate future location (e.g. hospital) of the injured player
  • Condition of the injured player (where known)

Reporting

  • A full injury report form should be completed immediately following treatment of the injured player
  • The completed report form will be filed at (insert location) for (insert number) years (this period will usually be determined to satisfy insurance requirements)
  • A copy of the injury report form will be provided to relevant parties (e.g. insurance company, affiliated local council)

Disclaimer

The information provided in this document is of a general nature and is not intended to be relied upon, not as a substitute for specific professional advice. No responsibility can be accepted by Golf Australia, Sportscover Australia or Podium Risk Advisory for loss occasioned to any person doing anything as a result of any material in this document.

 

On-line quoting launched for bespoke golf cover

1 September 2011

Access to the widest insurance cover at the most competitive premiums is now even easier for golf clubs with the launch of a new on-line quoting system.

Golf clubs can ask their insurance broker to obtain a quote through the Australian Golf Insurance website – www.australiangolfinsurance.com with an immediate response in most cases.

Australian Golf Insurance is the specialist golf programme that was launched last year by Golf Australia and Lloyd's insurer Sportscover and offers bespoke cover for golf club property, liability, professional indemnity, management liability and voluntary workers risks. At the time of launching the programme Golf Australia CEO, Stephen Pitt, said that it would help give clubs some peace of mind.

"The Australian Golf Insurance programme provides Golf Australia and the States the ability to minimise risk for all Australian golf clubs and golfers, something we as an industry have been striving towards for some time," Pitt said.

"This is a unique offering which provides all golf clubs in Australia the ability to obtain broad suitable cover as well as the ability to choose which broker they wish to deal with. No longer do clubs need to go to a single insurance broker to receive benefits that our buying power can generate." However, until now quotes under the programme were obtained by the club's insurance broker contacting Sportscover's underwriters. Now they can receive a quote electronically after registering on the site.

Sportscover CEO, Chris Nash, said "The programme has been hugely successful since its launch last year. However, we wanted to make it even easier for clubs to obtain this specialist programme and so we have introduced the on-line quoting system".

The on-line quoting system is available now and clubs and their brokers can obtain more details at www.australiangolfinsurance.com or by emailing golfaust@sportscover.com.

Golf Australia is the national sporting organisation for golf in Australia and the governing body for amateur golf. Its goal is to raise the level of interest and participation in the game from grassroots golfers through to the elite levels, spectators, volunteers and associated industry bodies. Key responsibilities incorporate managing national tournaments and championships including the Australian Opens as well as rules and handicapping. Working in with government, business and community, Golf Australia ensures the value of golf is understood and supported in all policy and business decisions. Golf is a game for life where participation contributes to a healthy Australian community. For more information on Golf Australia visit ww.golfaustralia.org.au.

Australian owned Sportscover is one of the world's leading sports insurance underwriters with offices in Australia, the United Kingdom, China and the Pacific. Sportscover specialises in accident, liability, property, travel and contingency insurances for sport and leisure. Sportscover's Lloyd's syndicate, SCS 3334, managed by Sportscover Underwriting Limited, is the only A+ rated dedicated sports insurer in the world. For more information on Sportscover visit www.sportscover.com

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Golf Course Risk Management - Finding the problem before it finds you

August 2011

Golf Clubs are increasingly exposed to unusual challenges due to the fact that they not only occupy large amounts of real estate but they often have several individual business operations functioning at the one site.

There are recreational facilities but these often include food services, retails sales, facility rentals, event hosting and other enterprises as part of the golf club operations. Additionally, there may be independent third party businesses operating by agreement with and at the club such as a professional golf shop. Each of these components have unique exposures such as fires, alcohol-related accidents, golf cart accidents, lightning strikes, wind and water damage, being struck by objects or slips, trips and falls.

With this in mind and as we lead up to the summer golf season there is no time better to start thinking about the year ahead and revisit your risk management process, or establish one if you do not already have one.

One of the best ways to prepare for the year ahead and to ensure that your risk management process is sound is to make some time to review the experiences of previous years and reflect on any problems that your club encountered and the best way to prevent similar events and injuries in 2012.

It would be wise to ask your insurance broker to review and provide you with a report of your claims history. Have your broker assist you to understand your own and maybe some of their experiences and outcomes. You may be surprised by some of the claims that your insurance company has paid on your behalf.

Many of these claims are preventable! Once you understand them you will be able to research the broader risks facing golf clubs in general.

Engage your staff, they are your frontline

One of your greatest opportunities is to engage your staff. They provide diverse experience and skills and many will have delegated responsibilities for specific operations at your Club. One of the key skills of a good employee is their ability to find and solve problems before they happen and you should encourage them to function this way and work closely with you in thinking about potential risks even before anything happens.

Begin your risk management planning by studying the specific areas where you have historically had problems and then ask your staff how to best prevent these issues from occurring again. What have you done to eliminate the risks? Did you post signs? Have you made plans to re- contoured the pathways? Have there been any new problems since you applied your solution?

By discussing your club grounds and buildings as a group, and walking the property together you can work as a team to identify areas that may need your attention. Take careful notes and make a list of potential trouble areas identified by your team.

These exercises are also a great way to invite ongoing feedback from your staff. After all, they are your frontline and most likely have many positive ideas about how you can reduce risks around your club.

Take up the challenge

Good risk management results in less accidents which means fewer claims and fewer claims has a direct and positive impact on containing insurance costs and your club's bottom line. Importantly, it protects and builds your reputation and brand. In these competitive and highly compliant times nobody can afford to ignore the importance of risk management.

The first step is a commitment to safety. This commitment begins with you and must always take priority when dealing with staff, members and guests. The only way to prevent injuries and theft is to change behaviour and eliminate dangerous circumstances before a problem occurs.

The next step is to seek advice from risk management experts and employ their recommendations at your facility. Golf Australia, your state associations, insurance brokers and risk management consultants are an excellent source of information and well worth the time and effort required to enlist their services.

Constantly review your insurance claims history with your team and look for ways to avoid similar accidents and losses in the future.

Risk management is demanding especially when time, budgets and resources are already stretched; however the rewards of becoming and remaining claims free will pay dividends for years.

You must take up the challenge and lead your staff, your members and your guests. Help them become better risk managers by finding the problem before it finds you.

Remember

  • Risk Management is for the welfare of the people at your club as well as to protect the club should an accident occur.
  • Clubs have a duty of care to provide a safe environment for its members and guests to enjoy.
  • A simple risk management process reduces the chance of somebody being hurt in the first place but also assists to protect the club financially if something does happen.
  • Engage your broker and seek their advice.

Some typical areas for discussion

Golf Car Operations

Maintenance, general handling and golf cart storage areas.

Golf Paths

Areas of concern include steep hills, sharp curves, blind areas, sharp drop-offs and roadway intersections that could lead to collisions and other accidents.

Central Alarm Monitoring

Clubhouse; pro-shop; golf club storage areas and all maintenance buildings should be alarmed and centrally monitored.

Alcohol Control Policies

Third party programs such as Good Sports are beneficial in ensuring staff are trained in responsible alcohol serving practices and that you comply with state liquor licencing requirements.

Errant Shot Areas & Adjacent Property

Review greens, tees, roadways and parking lots that are located in danger zones. Neighbouring residential and business areas and roadways.

Junior Golf

Children can find trouble that you may never imagine. Look out for are golf carts, other vehicle movements, golf balls and golf clubs.

Non-golfers

Walkers, cyclists, parents, spouses and accompanying children who are unaccustomed to the rules of golf and proper etiquette which may be at risk when on your property.

Severe Weather Communication

Does your course have a Lightning Detection System and what is your Evacuation Policy in the event of severe weather?

Slip, Trip & Fall Control

Review and walk the course, practice area, pro shop, clubhouse and parking lots to identify any potential risks that should be signed or re-contoured.

Employee Safety

Maintenance workers, golf cart attendants, greenkeepers, beverage cart workers and pro shop staff must be regularly briefed on the risks of working on and around your golf course. Take up the challenge.

Risk Management Ideas

Use golf course signage to address safety issues:

Post warning signs on golf cart paths, around hazards and include "No Trespassing" signs where warranted.

Use the scorecard to communicate safety information:

Your lightning policy, emergency information and shelter locations could be clearly marked on the score card.

Use waivers and releases in all contracts, entry forms and rental agreements:

Players, golf cart renters, non-players, events, weddings, banquets and tournaments must sign waivers.

Written policies and procedures:

Create formal written policies and procedures to help employees address foreseeable situations.

Acquire lightning protection equipment:

New technology will help you detect severe weather and evacuate the course quickly and safely.

Solicit safety feedback from players:

Encourage the use of golfer surveys, customer comment cards and use golf car feedback cards and make them available to guests.

Post golf course rules and regulations:

Rules regarding alcohol consumption, dangerous behaviour and horseplay must be clearly stated and posted in obvious locations.

Create junior golf safety training:

Start your junior golfers thinking about safety as soon as they take up the game.

Post safety information on bulletin boards:

Current events, pesticide application dates and construction warnings should be clearly posted for members and guests.

Use your website to emphasize safety:

Dedicate a section to "Player Safety" with information about lightning, the risk of skin cancer and the importance of yelling "Fore".

Disclaimer

The information provided in this document is of a general nature and is not intended to be relied upon, not as a substitute for specific professional advice. No responsibility can be accepted by Golf Australia, Sportscover Australia or Podium Risk Advisory for loss occasioned to any person doing anything as a result of any material in this document.

Medical Emergencies on the golf course

Is your club properly prepared to manage a member or employee suffering a life threatening injury, having a heart attack, stroke, diabetic reaction, or even a sudden cardiac arrest?

Is there a clear and understood process to ensure that all coaches, officials and volunteers are aware of their role in an emergency?

A medical emergency on the golf course requires immediate response by your staff to prevent a crisis that will have lasting impact on your entire club for years to come. Being prepared to manage any incident with a professional, competent and caring response will make the difference between a disaster and providing the ultimate in customer service.

Importantly, all golf clubs have a duty of care to ensure a safe environment is available to those in their care. This includes having a clearly documented plan that outlines the actions and processes that need to be fulfilled in an emergency situation. In order to satisfy or `discharge' your duty of care you must behave as a `reasonable person' would but taking into account your specific skills, knowledge and experience. For example, a committee member could be negligent if they placed a person in a position which required them to be in charge of the medical care of golfers when that person was not suitability qualified. A club could be negligent if they did not provide a safe playing environment for golfers and had no policies in place to ensure that first aid care requirements were met.

It is recommended that all resident golf professionals and club managers undergo suitable first aid training. It is recommended that a person with suitable experience be appointed as the first aid officer.

Establish an emergency plan

A comprehensive emergency plan should be in place to cover all types of emergency. They may include incidents such as fire, violence and environmental threats. This Risk Advisory Snapshot focusses on medical emergencies that are likely to occur on the golf course. A typical emergency plan may include reference to items such as:

The processes and the actions required of key personnel in the event of an emergency.

  • Each person should be familiar with their role and the actions required of them in an emergency. These roles should be understood by all involved. This may include coaches, officials, volunteers, members, etc.
  • The location of the nearest phone and a list of telephone numbers for ambulance, local hospital or local health professional.
  • To avoid numerous people calling for emergency services, everyone involved in an incident should be aware of who is responsible for emergency services.
  • The designated caller should also know the location of the nearest phone. All appropriate telephone numbers should be listed next to the telephone.
  • If a mobile phone is used, make sure the caller makes the call from a quiet location with suitable mobile coverage.

The address details of the venue at which the event is being held, and in particular, any special directions that need to be conveyed to emergency response personnel.

  • In circumstances where a medical professional or ambulance needs to be called, they should be given any special directions for easy access to the venue and injured player.
  • Venues should also ensure that designated access is available to emergency vehicles and the access is kept clear.

The person designated to take the lead responsibility in the plan.

  • Each person involved should know who will coordinate activities during an incident. This person plays a vital role in ensuring all aspects of the plan are fulfilled before, during and after an incident.

The location of any first aid and emergency equipment if required.

  • Like the telephone, this should be in an accessible location.
  • First aid supplies should always be well-stocked, so consideration should be given to allocating responsibility for first aid supply maintenance.

  • Someone should have the responsibility of informing parents, legal guardians or next of kin following the incident.
  • The type of details to be conveyed should also be clearly specified and medical details should only be conveyed by, or with approval from, medical personnel.

Incident report forms and processes.

  • All incidents should be well documented using an incident response form. This should be securely stored for future reference.

It is important that all personnel are aware of their role and required actions in the emergency plan. Emergency plans should be documented and communicated to all club members and participants. These plans should be updated regularly, and ideally should be rehearsed often for reinforcement of actions.

Although these incidents may not occur often, a sound, communicated and well-understood emergency plan may mean the difference between life and death in an emergency situation.

Example Medical Emergency Plan

Roles and Responsibilities

In the advent of a medical emergency/serious injury the assigned people will assume the following roles. (Each role should be accompanied by a list of duties and multiple roles may be required to be filled by one person)

  • Emergency Co-ordinator - (insert name)
  • Sports First Aid - (insert name/s)
  • Crowd Control - (insert name/s)
  • Communication Co-ordinator - (insert name)

In instances where any of the assigned people are not available an alternative representative must fill their role.

Leadership

The Emergency Co-ordinator (insert name) will be responsible for ensuring that all aspects of the plan are fulfilled before during and after the incident. This may include:

  • Availability of personnel at events
  • Sports first aid and communication resources
  • Direction of personnel at incidents
  • Completion of tasks following incidents
  • Record keeping
First Aid
  • A sports first aid kit is located at (insert location)
  • A sign will be erected to identify the location of the Sports first aid area
  • It is the responsibility of the Sports First-Aider to keep the first aid kit stocked. The Sports first aid kit will be checked (insert frequency e.g. weekly). Missing supplies will be ordered (insert frequency e.g. monthly).
Communication
  • The communications co-ordinator is responsible for contacting emergency services (e.g. ambulance) if required
  • The nearest telephone is located at (insert location)
  • Mobile phone calls for emergency purposes should be made from (insert location)
  • A list of relevant emergency numbers will be posted at (insert the location where phone calls to emergency services are to be made)
  • A list of any special directions for emergency services personnel will be posted at the same location as the emergency numbers (insert locations)
  • (Insert name) will be responsible for ensuring that access for emergency services is kept clear.
Contacts
  • All players/participants must supply the name and contact details of two (2) guardians/next of kin at the commencement of each season
  • Contact names of guardians/next of kin are to be kept on file and accessible during events and training
  • It is the responsibility of (insert name) to contact guardians/next of kin in the advent of a serious injury to a player/participant
  • The type of information conveyed to a guardian/next of kin should include
  • Description of the incident
  • Transport arrangements (if any) for the injured player
  • Current location and any immediate future location (e.g. hospital) of the injured player
  • Condition of the injured player (where known)
Reporting
  • A full injury report form should be completed immediately following treatment of the injured player
  • The completed report form will be filed at (insert location) for (insert number) years (this period will usually be determined to satisfy insurance requirements)
  • A copy of the injury report form will be provided to relevant parties (e.g. insurance company, affiliated local council)
Disclaimer

The information provided in this document is of a general nature and is not intended to be relied upon, not as a substitute for specific professional advice. No responsibility can be accepted by Golf Australia, Sportscover Australia or Podium Risk Advisory for loss occasioned to any person doing anything as a result of any material in this document.

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Australian golfers and clubs benefit from new insurance program

14th October, 2010

Golf clubs and golfers now have access to some of the widest cover available at the most competitive premiums through a new insurance product partnership between Golf Australia and insurer Sportscover.

The Australian Golf Insurance program provided by Sportscover's Lloyd's syndicate, will offer bespoke cover for golf club property, liability, professional indemnity, management liability and voluntary workers risks. Golf clubs can access these products through any licensed general insurance broker in Australia.

Golf Australia CEO, Stephen Pitt, said the program would help give clubs some peace of mind.

"The Australian Golf Insurance program provides Golf Australia and the States the ability to minimize risk for all Australian golf clubs and golfers, something we as an industry have been striving towards for some time," Pitt said.

"This is a unique offering which provides all golf clubs in Australia the ability to obtain broad suitable cover as well as the ability to choose which broker they wish to deal with. No longer do clubs need to go to a single insurance broker to receive benefits that our buying power can generate."

Sportscover CEO, Chris Nash, said "We are delighted to be working with Golf Australia to provide specialist insurance products that will be of benefit to the golfing community. As a keen golfer myself, and as someone working in the insurance industry, I know the importance of getting cover with an insurer who understands the risk and can offer A rated security. Golf clubs can be certain that they will have both with this new partnership."

The anticipated support of golf clubs for this initiative will allow the golf industry to play a role in influencing sustainable competitive risk and insurance costs for all stakeholders. The new product is available now and clubs and their brokers can obtain more details at www.australiangolfinsurance.com or by emailing golfaust@sportscover.com.

Golf Australia is the national sporting organisation for golf in Australia and the governing body for amateur golf. Its goal is to raise the level of interest and participation in the game from grassroots golfers through to the elite levels, spectators, volunteers and associated industry bodies. Key responsibilities incorporate managing national tournaments and championships including the Australian Opens as well as rules and handicapping. Working in with government, business and community, Golf Australia ensures the value of golf is understood and supported in all policy and business decisions. Golf is a game for life where participation contributes to a healthy Australian community. For more information on Golf Australia visit ww.golfaustralia.org.au.

Australian owned Sportscover is one of the world's leading sports insurance underwriters with offices in Australia, the United Kingdom, China and the Pacific. Sportscover specialises in accident, liability, property, travel and contingency insurances for sport and leisure. Sportscover's Lloyd's syndicate, SCS 3334, managed by Sportscover Underwriting Limited, is the only A+ rated dedicated sports insurer in the world. For more information on Sportscover visit www.sportscover.com

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Golfers benefit from new insurance protection

18 September 2008

Golf Australia-affiliated golfers will now have on-course protection through a new insurance product partnership between Golf Australia and insurer Sportscover

Provided through Sportscover's Lloyd's of London syndicate, the insurance will provide comprehensive cover for golfer's personal liability and also give them access, through their golf club, to cost-effective cover for personal accident and golf equipment insurance.

Golf Australia Manager - Industry Development Alex McGillivray said the partnership would benefit Australian golfers.

"The lack of consistency in the personal liability cover previously provided to individual golfers at affiliated and non-affiliated clubs was of concern to Golf Australia," Mr McGillivray said.

"The situation was not ideal for the development of golf in Australia where potentially 80% of players were not covered."

All affiliated players, officials, volunteers, and trailing participants in recognised development programs will now have $20 million Public Liability Cover from 1 July 2009 and the option for their club to come on board earlier if they wish.

Sportscover Australia Ltd's CEO, Murray Anderson said, "We are delighted to be working with Golf Australia to provide specialist insurance products that will be of benefit to the golfing community.

As a keen golfer myself, and as someone working in the insurance industry, I know the importance of getting cover with an insurer who understands the risk and can offer A rated security. Golfers can be certain that they will have both with this new partnership."

Mr McGillivray said it had been "an extensive and highly competitive tender process. Our aim was to prevent another case like Magnetic Island where a claim for over $2 million was awarded against a golfer, this goes some way to avoiding that by covering affiliated golfers."

The agreement has also seen cover secured for public liability and professional indemnity for registered amateur coaches, which is key to the development of the sport.

"We wanted to have a product that is competitive with other insurance options on the market and we're confident we've achieved an outstanding result here," Mr McGillivray said.

The new programme comes into effect through members' affiliation fees from 1 July 2009 and when combined with the injury and golf equipment coverage could potentially save the Golf Club industry $2 million a year.

The overall aim of Golf Australia was to assist the development of the sport and cover all participants that played the game. This partnership is an essential part of that ambition.

Coverage for pay for play players will also be available at participating venues that take up Golf Australia's development service.

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